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This Sliding Bar can be switched on or off in theme options, and can take any widget you throw at it or even fill it with your custom HTML Code. Its perfect for grabbing the attention of your viewers. Choose between 1, 2, 3 or 4 columns, set the background color, widget divider color, activate transparency, a top border or fully disable it on desktop and mobile.

This Is A Custom Widget

This Sliding Bar can be switched on or off in theme options, and can take any widget you throw at it or even fill it with your custom HTML Code. Its perfect for grabbing the attention of your viewers. Choose between 1, 2, 3 or 4 columns, set the background color, widget divider color, activate transparency, a top border or fully disable it on desktop and mobile.

This Is A Custom Widget

This Sliding Bar can be switched on or off in theme options, and can take any widget you throw at it or even fill it with your custom HTML Code. Its perfect for grabbing the attention of your viewers. Choose between 1, 2, 3 or 4 columns, set the background color, widget divider color, activate transparency, a top border or fully disable it on desktop and mobile.
HISTORY OF OUR ROADS 2017-08-03T16:15:33+00:00

HOW DID WE GET HERE?

OUR ROAD HISTORY 

The roads issue Pleasant Grove is facing is a massive one. How did we get here?  

The roads issue Pleasant Grove is facing is a massive one. How did we get here?  

Over 50 years ago, Pleasant Grove’s Main Street held the only businesses in the area. The citizens did not want big businesses or major development and wanted to protect the small shops and quaint feeling of the city. The city did not actively seek (and even sometimes turned away) businesses looking to locate in Pleasant Grove. These choices kept us behind in economic growth, but NOT in residential growth. With a growing population, services are required, which always cost money. Our business revenue (sales tax) did not keep up with the population increase.

Why are the roads in such poor condition?

As the city rapidly grew, Pleasant Grove leadership decided to install a secondary water system to ensure there would be enough water for our needs. A major problem with the secondary water was that it was far more expensive than was communicated to the citizens, requiring a dramatic rate increase after it was fully installed. Cutting into the asphalt to install the system also caused major road damage. Installing a secondary water system cut the life of all the roads in half. Each road should have been repaved and brought back up to near perfect life again after the irrigation lines were put in.

However, as the secondary water installation was nearing completion, which took years, Pleasant Grove hired a new financial director and elected a new mayor. Together they discovered that the expense of the secondary water system, rapid residential growth, low taxes, and lack of economic development were moving Pleasant Grove towards bankruptcy. To keep the city solvent, the new mayor cut every possible budget—including the funding to repave roads. Roads that had been cut for water lines were patched instead of fully fixed, but on the bright side, we did not lose control of our city to the state.

Note: When a city goes bankrupt, the state steps in and takes over the city – not an ideal situation.

Why haven’t we kept up on the roads maintenance and repair?

During this time of rapid population growth, the city added other services as well: the current library (1987), the current pool (1995), and the new rec center (2008). All of these amenities were important enough to the residents and leadership of Pleasant Grove to take priority in our budgets. Roads were not given the highest priority. While roads are important, excellent, affordable city programs and amenities elevate home values and attract people and business more than smooth roads.

Thankfully, in the last 3–5 years, our city council has done more to bring new businesses to Pleasant Grove than ever before. They have also worked to dedicate more funds to the roads that has ever been available in the past. Our most recent representatives have been working hard to overcome decades of choices that led us to our current financial struggles, but there are no overnight solutions.

To learn more about the city’s plan to fund the 44 miles of failing roads, click here